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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

8 edition of The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (The Critical Moments and Perspectives in Earth History and Paleobiology) found in the catalog.

The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (The Critical Moments and Perspectives in Earth History and Paleobiology)

  • 147 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Columbia University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Palaeontology,
  • Science,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Science / Paleontology,
  • History,
  • Biodiversity,
  • Biological diversity,
  • Ordovician,
  • Paleontology

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsBarry D. Webby (Editor), Florentin Paris (Editor), Mary L. Droser (Editor), Ian G. Percival (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages496
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9327655M
    ISBN 100231126786
    ISBN 109780231126786

      The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event coincides ~ million years ago with the break-up of a large asteroid and the resultant frequent bombardment of Cited by: The Cambrian period, known for the "Cambrian Explosion" that saw the sudden appearance of all the major animal groups and the establishment of complex ecosystems, was followed by the "Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event," when the number of marine animal genera increased exponentially over a period of 25 million years.

    The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE) laid the foundation for present-day biodiversity levels and set an agenda for marine life against a background of modern-type climates. The event was protracted, commencing at the beginning of the Ordovician Cited by:   Edwards, C. T. & Saltzman, M. R. Paired carbon isotopic analysis of Ordovician bulk carbonate (δ 13 C carb) and organic matter (δ 13 C org) spanning the Cited by:

    Two of the greatest evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth occurred during Early Paleozoic time. The first was the Cambrian explosion of skeletonized marine animals about million years ago. The second was the "Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event," which is the focus of this book. During the million-year Ordovician Period ( m.y.), a bewildering array of adaptive. Servais, T. & Harper, D.A.T. The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE): definition, concept and duration. Lethaia, Vol. 51, pp. – The Ordovician biodiversification has been recognized since the s; the term ‘The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event’, abbreviated by many as the ‘GOBE’, hasCited by:


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The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (The Critical Moments and Perspectives in Earth History and Paleobiology) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Two of the greatest evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth occurred during Early Paleozoic time. The first was the Cambrian explosion of skeletonized marine animals about million years ago. The second The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event book the "Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event," which is the focus of this book.

The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE), possibly the most profound biological radiation of the Phanerozoic, featured a quadrupled diversity increase at the genus-level and largely.

The highly successful International Geological Correlation Programme (IGCP) project n° ‘The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event’ extended from toand resulted not only in the generation of biodiversity curves for all Ordovician fossil groups (Webby et al., a) but also in the development of an improved globally Cited by:   The ‘Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event’ could also be named the ‘Great Ordovician Biodiversification Events’, in plural, similar to Sepkoski's use of the term ‘Ordovician Radiations’.

Similarly, it could be questioned whether the ‘Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event’ can be named an ‘event’, because the entire Cited by: Book Description: Two of the greatest evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth occurred during Early Paleozoic time.

The first was the Cambrian explosion of skeletonized marine animals about million years ago. The second was the "Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event," which is the focus of this book.

The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event. November ; DOI: /_4. In book: The Trace-Fossil Record of Major Evolutionary Events The Great Ordovician Biodiv ersi. Two of the greatest evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth occurred during Early Paleozoic time. The first was the Cambrian explosion of skeletonized marine animals about million years ago.

The second was the "Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event," which is the focus of this book. During the million-year Ordovician Period (– m.y.), a bewildering array of. The second was the ""Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event, "" which is the focus of this book. During the million-year Ordovician Period ( m.y.), a bewildering array of adaptive radiations of ""Paleozoic- and Modern-type"" biotas appeared in marine habitats, the first animals (arthropods) walked on land, and the first non.

The Ordovician meteor event was a dramatic increase in the rate at which L chondrite meteorites fell to Earth during the Middle Ordovician period, about ± million years ago.

This is indicated by abundant fossil L chondrite meteorites in a quarry in Sweden and enhanced concentrations of ordinary chondritic chromite grains in sedimentary rocks from this med≥20 km diameter: Acraman, Amelia.

The great Ordovician biodiversification event. [B D Webby;] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create The book stands as an indispensable reference. Two of the greatest evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth occurred during Early Paleozoic time.

The first was the Cambrian explosion of skeletonized marine animals about million years ago. The second was the "Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event," which is the focus of this book. During the million-year Ordovician Period ( m.y.), a bewildering array of. Pattern of diversification among rhynchonelliform brachiopods.

From Harper et al. This IGCP project, funded for the yearsin an international effort to investigate the initiating causes and processes that produced the rapid diversification of marine organisms during the Ordovician Period, known as the ‘Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event’ (GOBE).

Two of the greatest evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth occurred during Early Paleozoic time.

The first was the Cambrian explosion of skeletonized marine animals about million years ago. The second was the "Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event," which is the focus of this : Hardcover. The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (The Critical Moments and Perspectives in Earth History and Paleobiology) - Kindle edition by Webby, Barry, Paris, Florentin, Droser, Mary, Percival, Ian.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event Price: $ Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more.

Two of the greatest evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth occurred during Early Paleozoic time. The first was the Cambrian explosion of skeletonized marine animals about million years ago.

The second was the "Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event," which is the focus of this book. The Global Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE) was undoubtedly one of the most significant evolutionary events in the history of the marine biosphere.

A continuous increase in ichnodiversity occurs through the Ordovician in both shallow- and deep-marine by: of Sessionthe IGCP session on the "Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event", in the General (Paleontology and Historical Geology) Symposium on 14 to 15 August. Oral and poster presentations were contributed by delegates from 8 different countries of the Americas, Asia and Europe.

The GOBE is considered the most rapid diversity increase in marine life during Earth’s history. Enormous climate changes took place. The causal roles of. The Cambrian Explosion records the first occurrence of most animal phyla, but dramatic diversification of marine organisms at the family and genus level did not occur until the 'Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event' (GOBE) nearly 40 ma later.

The GOBE includes a series of diversifications that completely modified marine food webs and that, for the first time in geological times. Climate Change CO2 and Human Evolution during the GOBE Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event - Duration: Philosophical Investigations 1, views   Could the mid-Ordovician impacts have changed the course of life on earth?

In Birger Schmitz 8 linked them to a dramatic event in the history of life: the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE).

Spanning 25 million years, this event saw an unprecedented increase in the number of species of fossil animals.The second was the "Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event," which is the focus of this book.

During the million-year Ordovician Period (– m.y.), a bewildering array of adaptive radiations of "Paleozoic- and Modern-type" biotas appeared in marine habitats, the first animals (arthropods) walked on land, and the first non-vascular.